Tutorials and Afternoon Conference Sessions
December 8, 2014

Monday
December 8
7:00–6:00
Registration
Monday
December 8
7:00–8:30
Continental Breakfast
8:30 - 11:45 MORNING TUTORIALS

Monday
December 8
8:30-11:45

ArrowBack to top

AM1 - The First 11 Steps to Starting a World-Class Enterprise Data Governance Program 
David Marco, President, EWSolutions

Data and information are critical assets of any organization, and should be considered as valuable a resource as buildings, employees and products.  For a company to gain a significant competitive advantage, it must focus on managing and using its data effectively.  Data stewardship and the governance of information assets are essential parts of any relevant information systems strategy for the 21st century.

Moreover, without a successful data stewardship and governance program it is impossible to properly implement an enterprise master data management effort or any enterprise-spanning activity.

This intensive half day session will present the first 11 key tasks in creating and implementing a data governance and stewardship program, based upon successful real-world implementations at several leading edge companies.  The attendees will gain an understanding of the importance of data governance, the various types of information management approaches, the data steward’s function in the data-information-knowledge continuum, and will provide proven approaches to the implementation of a data stewardship and governance program. 

Level of Audience:
Introductory

Speaker:
David Marco David Marco
President
EWSolutions

ArrowTo Speaker's BIO

Arrow

Monday
December 8
8:30-11:45

ArrowBack to top

AM2 - The Care and Feeding of Data Governance in the Big Data Age 
Anne Buff, Thought Leader, SAS

The nutritional needs of maturing data governance programs are extensive, especially in the big data age. Just when you think you have figured out exactly what you must provide and do to sustain your program, new needs and requirements emerge. Like a growing teenager, it seems like data governance is always hungry for more.

Merriam-Webster defines care and feeding as “the providing of what is needed for sustenance, well-being or efficient operation.”  What are the key elements to nurture healthy data governance and help it thrive in the age of big data and for generations to come? This tutorial examines the essentials necessary for cultivating successful, flourishing data governance programs in environments with diverse appetites.

What You Will Learn:

  • Calories and Nutrients: The core elements necessary to sustain data governance. Understand the nutritional value of essential data governance components because not all efforts are worth the calories.
  • Vitamins and Minerals: Deficiencies in data governance exist, even with the most heroic of efforts. Discover the supplements to add that will boost the immunity and strength of your program to support healthy growth and development and withstand unexpected challenges.
  • Exercise and Fitness: The actions and behaviors that will keep your data governance team a lean, mean and calorie-burning machine. Learn the activities that deliver immediate results, the heavy lifting that builds strong muscle mass and the successful behaviors that should become habits.
  • Care Givers and Takers: The people involved in the care and feeding of data governance. As your data governance program matures, the needs will change. Having the right people to address these needs is critical. Identify the roles and responsibilities needed for your program to not only survive, but also thrive.

Level of Audience:
Advanced

Speaker:
Anne Buff Anne Buff
Thought Leader
SAS

ArrowTo Speaker's BIO
Arrow

Monday
December 8
8:30-11:45

ArrowBack to top

AM3 - Data Governance and Metadata: The Two-Way Street 
Robert S. Seiner, President / Publisher, KIK Consulting / TDAN.com

The relationship between Metadata and Data Governance can be considered a two-way street.  Metadata, as data about the people associated with the data, is a natural by-product of an effective Data Governance program.  And metadata itself must be governed in order for that metadata to add value to business and technical opportunities.

How can we leverage this relationship to quickly and efficiently improve the management of data?  How can we enable our organization to view Metadata and Data Governance side-by-side as complimentary teammates in the effort to manage data as a valued corporate asset?  The answers to these questions may not be as difficult as you think.

Join Robert S. Seiner for a tutorial where he will provide a practical model and messages for management regarding how to lock the Metadata and Data Governance disciplines together as the Backbone of managing Data as an Asset.

The session will cover:

  • Message for Management Relating Data Governance & Metadata
  • Metadata that is a By-Product of Data Governance
  • How to Govern Metadata and Metadata Processes
  • Aligning Metadata Efforts with Governance Efforts
  • Metadata as a Governed Asset

Level of Audience:
Intermediate

Speaker:
Robert S. Seiner Robert S. Seiner
President / Publisher
KIK Consulting / TDAN.com

ArrowTo Speaker's BIO

1:00 - 4:15 AFTERNOON TUTORIALS

Monday
December 8
1:00–4:15

ArrowBack to top

PM1 - Developing and Implementing a Data Quality Framework Supporting Data Governance  
David Loshin, President, Knowledge Integrity, Inc

A Data Quality Framework is intended to institute best practices for proactive assessment, measurement, inspection, monitoring, notification, tracking, and resolution of data quality issues. Identifying and implementing the associated componentry coupled with best practices in data quality management will help retool existing workflow processes with automated systems that can help reduce the need for manual data inspection while rapidly alerting data stewards to identified issues.

This tutorial looks at leveraging an organization’s existing data management infrastructure, available development tools, and practical data quality best practices to develop a formal framework for data quality management that organizes practices for:

  • Data quality rules management: Soliciting and managing data quality requirements and validation rules for data verification.
  • Data quality measurement and reporting: Enabling and invoking services to validate data against data rules and report anomalies and data flaws, both through notifications and through scorecards.
  • Standardized data validation: Validate existing processes while integrating services for data verification within newly-developed processes.
  • Source data quality assessment: Source data assessment and evaluation of data issues to identify potential data quality rules.
  • Incident management: Standardized approaches to data quality incident management (reporting, analysis/evaluation, prioritization, remediation, tracking).

Level of Audience:
Intermediate

Speaker:
David Loshin David Loshin
President
Knowledge Integrity, Inc

ArrowTo Speaker's BIO
Arrow

Monday
December 8
1:00–4:15

ArrowBack to top

PM2 - Governing Master Data
Kelle O'Neal, CEO, First San Francisco Partners

You have set up a data governance program to monitor and improve data quality, but now it has become clear that your high quality data is not accurate when shared across systems and lines of business. Your IT team is talking about Master Data Management (MDM). How do you extend your governance capabilities to handle MDM? In this workshop, we will talk about the link between Data Governance and MDM and how the two programs can work synergistically to improve information management in your organization.

Questions we will answer include:

  • What decisions need to be made in advance of implementing an MDM solution?
  • What issues may come to the governance team during an MDM implementation?
  • Should each data domain be handled differently?
  • Do we need different people or skill-sets to govern master data?
  • How can we leverage master data across the enterprise?
This is a practical workshop that will be valuable to those companies who are considering MDM and Data Governance as part of their overall Enterprise Information Management Strategy. We will use real-world examples of how Data Governance organizations have been involved in planning for and implementing a Master Data Management solution.

Level of Audience:
Introductory

Speaker:
Kelle O'Neal Kelle O'Neal
CEO
First San Francisco Partners

ArrowTo Speaker's BIO
Arrow

Monday
December 8
1:00–4:15

ArrowBack to top

PM3 - How to Avoid the Most Common Mistakes in Selling and Implementing Data Governance 
John Ladley, President, IMCue Solutions

Too many organizations miss the mark with getting data governance sold and started.   Often the potential sponsors and stakeholders leave the presentation confused and de-motivated.  John will explore several scenarios in this tutorial and will address the common errors and how to remedy the results, or avoid the issues altogether.

 He will address:

  • Strategies to regain managements attention, or never lose it in the first place
  • The huge challenge of old-style, embedded data management practices
  • The difference between typical and successful business cases
  • Common statements about data governance that are misunderstood or presented wrong
  • Dumb things that are still being done over and over

Level of Audience:
Introductory

Speaker:
John Ladley John Ladley
President
IMCue Solutions

ArrowTo Speaker's BIO

4:30 - 5:20 AFTERNOON CONFERENCE SESSIONS

Monday
December 8
4:30–5:20

ArrowBack to top

Building Momentum Through Project-driven Data Governance
Natalie Sendele, Manager - Data Governance, Artisan Partners

You've likely heard variations of top-down or bottom-up approaches to getting a Data Governance program off the ground, but what about starting in the middle?  Integrating Data Governance into business driven enterprise projects can provide early wins and exposure.  Keeping that momentum and sustained involvement is critical to continue success, however ensuring Data Governance is viewed as a philosophy rather than a project is as well.  In practice, finding a balance between project-driven Data Governance and broader strategic thinking can pave the way for continued success.

Topics include:

  • Leveraging enterprise projects as an accelerator for Data Governance
  • Challenges, value and benefits of a project-driven Data Governance approach
  • How to influence business projects in a valuable way
  • Instilling data governance outside of projects

Level of Audience:
Intermediate

Speaker:
Natalie Sendele Natalie Sendele
Manager - Data Governance
Artisan Partners

arrowTo Speaker's BIO
Arrow

Monday
December 8
4:30–5:20

ArrowBack to top

Data Quality - More than just CSI (Crime Scene Investigation)
Dorene Cardozo, Data Architecture Data Lead, State Farm

Why do we need Data Quality processes?   If everything is coded correctly and tested, then there should never be any data quality issues, right?  Seems great in theory but let’s face it, reality can be very different.

Who participates in Data Quality practices and how do they participate?  Learn how the Enterprise Architecture, the Business, Data designers, screen designers, Database Administrators, Application Developers, Testers and even the Data Quality team all play a role in the various stages of the Data Quality life-cycle.

In this session you will also hear about practical lessons learned by the presenter in her experience at State Farm.

Level of Audience:
Introductory

Speaker:
Dorene Cardozo Dorene Cardozo
Data Architecture Data Lead
State Farm

ArrowTo Speaker's BIO

Arrow

Monday
December 8
4:30–5:20

ArrowBack to top

Defining and Applying Data Governance in Today’s Business Environment
Joe Caserta, President and Founder, Caserta Concepts

In business today, we deal with the reality of unprecedented volume of structured and unstructured data, coming in from a variety of verified and un-verified sources. We are all witness to the convergence of data quality, management and policies surrounding these vast amounts of data now present in any organization.   A set of processes - or governance - must be put in place to ensure that these critically important corporate “assets” are effectively and formally managed throughout the enterprise.

In today’s session, will focus on the new information culture we are all living in and the basics for governance success, including the need to:

  • Explore information in new ways
  • Develop a strong strategy, basic rules and very specific steps toward achieving data governance
  • Adopt a methodology to fix and prevent issues with the data across the enterprise
  • Support high - and strive to avert low - data quality
  • Confidently determine who sees what in a secure environment
  • Be willing to step up to the plate and be held accountable for any adverse event that may occur
  • Be open to the ever-changing technology that is driving the development of the tools to get you there.

Level of Audience:
Intermediate

Speaker:
Joe Caserta Joe Caserta
President and Founder
Caserta Concepts

ArrowTo Speaker's BIO

Arrow

Monday
December 8
5:30–6:15

ArrowBack to top

Data Governance and Health Care Special Interest Group
Eileen Koski, Health Care SIG Leader, Data Governance Professionals Organization &
Director, Data Governance, North Shore LIJ Health System

All conference attendees are invited to participate


Many elements of Data Governance and Stewardship are very similar across industries, but others are specific to - sometimes even unique to - certain industries.   Healthcare as an industry faces a host of data governance challenges from patient and provider identity management to patient privacy to health interoperability and health information exchange.
In March of this year, DGPO members from different areas of healthcare, including payers, providers, pharmaceutical companies and others, came together to form the DGPO Data Governance and Health Care Special Interest Group (SIG).  The purpose of this SIG is to provide a forum where people in the healthcare industry can interact with their peers and learn more about techniques and approaches that may be valuable in their own environments, particularly related to how Data Governance and Stewardship can help them address emerging needs in a rapidly changing industry. 

The focus of the meeting will be two-fold:
  • To discuss how major changes in healthcare, particularly risk-sharing arrangements, have affected data needs and how Data Governance can be used to help address these needs
  • To listen to your issues and goals and understand how the SIG can best evolve to meet your needs

The topics we discuss in the future will be driven by the group members, so we are looking to you to tell us your stories and to share your challenges and solutions with your peers.

We encourage you to bring your questions, concerns, unique perspectives and your curiosity to the table and join us as we continue to grow the SIG and find new ways to support each other in our journey towards better health care through better data!

Level of Audience:
All Levels

Speaker:
Eileen Koski Eileen Koski
Health Care SIG Leader
Data Governance Professionals Organization &
Director, Data Governance
North Shore LIJ Health System

ArrowTo Speaker's BIO